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General Audience

  • Mee Magnum
  • December 03, 2014 11:14:44 AM

A Little About Us

What started humbly as five friends gathered for a night out, has grown to a quest. A Chinese Quest. Follow along as five hungry Jewish guys search for THE BEST Chinese Restaurant on all of Long Island (and now New York City too)! What do Jews like? A bargain AND Chinese food! It started innocently enough. Now it's become something bigger than even their appetites. Or, has it? So, follow along and let's see where their journey takes them in their search. They welcome your suggestions and feedback. And if you're lucky enough, perhaps they'll ask you to join them on one of their crusades! So pack your chop sticks, we're about to hit the road!

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2021 The Year of the Ox

February 12, 2021 starts the Chinese Year of the Ox. Wishing Everyone a Happy Chinese New Year! This guide will teach you everything you need to know about the Ox, Are you an Ox? Is there an Ox in your future? It's leagues better than a Jack in the Box! The Ox is perfect for this pandemic plagued year. Be Strong! Like an Ox!! The post 2021 The Year of the Ox appeared first on The Chinese...

 

Lucky Mee (Bernadette King of BuildingBeautifulSouls.com) teaches us all about The Ox.  2021 is the Year of the Ox, which starts on February 12, 2021.  Read this now and be prepared on the 12th to share your expertise with friends and family.  Maybe you will score a free appetizer or two.

Chinese Zodiac Ox Traits & PersonalityIf we had to sum up the Chinese Ox in one word it would be endurance.

This Chinese Zodiac Sign has amazing stamina on all levels of being!

Even so, the Ox is not interested in rushing and abusing all that energy. They would rather take the slow-steady approach, erring on the side of conventional wisdom. Some might even call them old-fashioned.

Progress doesn’t come quickly to those born in The Year of the Ox, but it does come by way of unending determination. Ever heard the phrase “Slow and steady wins the race”? An Ox came up with that!

Chinese Ox people have a strong sense of honor and ethics. If they say something, you can trust in it and when they shape relationships, they’ll endure.

In terms of challenging personality traits, Ox can be somewhat biased and demanding. If they put down their hoof, there is no weakness involved. Should they reach the point of anger – just get out of the way (quickly). They need to blow off a whole lot of steam before even considering another perspective.

Ox keynotes include honesty, simplicity patient, and vigilance. They take time making decisions and have a base-line aptitude for honoring tradition. Family and work both rank highly in their mind and spirit.

Chinese Zodiac Ox Compatibility

In relationships, it’s easy to find an Ox partner ungainly in romance. They lumber through affectionate shows and certainly don’t wear their heart on a sleeve. Once they find the right partner, however, true to Ox form – it’s eternal. If having someone in your life who is as straight and true as the arrow flies then you’ll love being in love with this Chinese New Year Animal.

The best matches for Ox are the Chinese Snake and Chinese Rooster.  [Ed:  Mee Magnum is a Rooster]

Chinese Zodiac Ox Children

Growing up the Ox child isn’t a chatter bug – in fact, you might worry about the lack of communication. This has a lot to do with the need for privacy and an overly serious nature. The best gift a parent can give their Ox child is a consistent, dependable routine that provides a comfort zone.

Metaphysical Associations

The Chinese Oxen’s metaphysical correspondences in this astrological system include the color Blue, Direction of North, and the Number 1 in Numerology.

Chinese Zodiac Posts supplied by The Chinese Quest Groupie – Lucky Mee (Bernadette King of BuildingBeautifulSouls.com).

Learn much more about the Chinese Zodiac Sign of Ox.

Learn more about Chinese New Year with our Top 10 Interesting Facts about Chinese New Year.

Delve into the symbolism and meaning of the color Blue, the Direction of North, and the Number 1 in Numerology.

Gung Hay Fat Choy!!

The post 2021 The Year of the Ox appeared first on The Chinese Quest.


Bah Humbug! NO Chinese Restaurant Reviews This Christmas

Our annual tradition of recommending Chinese restaurants for Jews to eat at on Christmas has been hijacked by the biggest Scrooge of them all. COVID-19. The opinions expressed in this article are those of Mee Magnum, and may not represent the opinions of the other Mee's. Reader discretion advised. Article contains vulgar language. The post Bah Humbug! NO Chinese Restaurant Reviews This Christmas appeared first on The Chinese...

THIS is what COVID-19 has driven us to.  The year from hell.  It tried to put restaurants out of business.  It tried to render us insignificant.  It TRIED to put The Chinese Quest out of business.  But, we ARE coming back baby.  Just you wait and see.

Blame it all on COVID-19 for the fact that we are not going to continue our annual Christmas holiday suggestions for Jews to go to on Christmas tradition.  Every year people look forward to our series of extra-special Chinese restaurants.  But what are you getting from us?  COAL.  Nothing.  Nada.  ZIP.  

COVID-19, we are feeling the pains you have caused.  The suffering we have endured.  Loved ones we lost.  Humanity isolated.  The joy of dining together with friends and family, you replaced with loneliness and depression.  You are one nasty bug.  And now you are putting even more pressure on us as you mutate.  Trying to crush us like insects.  

Remember the COAL?  Well, COVID-19, you are fucking with humans.  Squeeze us hard.  HARDER.  We will not cave.  We will take your evil.  Take all you’ve dished out.  Pressure?  Trying to destroy us.  Squeezing tighter.  Keep going.  COVID, do you know what happens when you apply enormous pressure to coal?  DIAMONDS.  Diamonds.  The hardest material in the world.  The shiniest.  Brightest.  WATCH us glitter in 2021.  We’re going to stroll into restaurants with diamonds on the soles of our shoes.  Take that COVID-19!

Diamonds-on-the-soles-of-her-shoes

(Women’s shoes available for pre-order now. Men’s styles coming in the Spring of 2021)

We are fighting back now.  With vaccines to render you harmless.  We will be back stronger.  Hungrier.  Society will open again.  Businesses will thrive again.  Restaurants will open again.  It is going to be one fucking big party in 2021.  Celebrations like you’ve never seen.  Food like you’ve never tasted.  Restaurants re-opening.  Stores rebounding.  Joy again spread through the land.  And when all of those Chinese restaurants open, THEN the Chinese Quest will be back.  Better.  Stronger.  Cast-iron bellies ready to try everything.  Dishes we never heard of.  Bring them on.  Seconds of everything!!

syringes-as-chopsticks

(FDA approval pending for use as chopsticks)

COVID-19.  2020.  FUCK OFF!  Begone!

Very humbly submitted for your consumption,

Mee Magnum (“Chop!  Chop!”)

P.S.  For those offended by the language used in this article, I offer my humblest and sincerest apologies.  But, when you mess with New Yorkers, damn it, we won’t take your sh!t.

P.P.S.  For those people really looking for a good Chinese restaurant to eat this Christmas, or any day of the year, check out our series of what, and where, Jews will eat on Christmas.

Please share this article if you enjoyed it! click-to-share

The post Bah Humbug! NO Chinese Restaurant Reviews This Christmas appeared first on The Chinese Quest.


Must-Visit Chinese Food Places in NYC’s Boroughs of Manhattan and Queens

Manhattan and Queens' neighborhoods offer all the wonderful opportunities for you to savor the many delicate nuances of Chinese cuisine. Since The Chinese Quest hasn't reviewed any Chinese restaurants yet in Manhattan, as a public service, we are sharing this guest article.  Please note that some of the Chinese restaurants on this list are no longer in business.  If you want to eat at one of these restaurants, please call ahead to make sure they are still in business and open in these...

Note:  Since The Chinese Quest has not reviewed any Chinese restaurants yet in Manhattan, as a public service, we are sharing this guest article.  Please note that some of the Chinese restaurants on this list are no longer in business.  If you want to eat at one of these restaurants, please call ahead to make sure they are still in business and open during these COVID-19 times. 

The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of The Chinese Quest.

Manhattan and Queens’ neighborhoods offer all the wonderful opportunities for you to savor the many delicate nuances of Chinese cuisine. From the most basic $3.75 (at current prices) with 3 viands plus steamed rice to ultra-priced gourmet food servings in tony restaurants outside of Chinatown, customers can take their pick. Keep in mind that if the food place is located outside of Chinatown, expect it to be pricier than usual. But if you like something affordable and still great tasting then head off quickly to Chinatown.

1) Flor de Mayo This is Chinese cuisine (Cantonese, specifically), Latin American (i.e. Peruvian) style which you can enjoy somewhere in the Upper West Side. For its fusion food that you may expect in fancy food places, this place is very affordable. Highly sought out dishes include “ceviche mixto” with onions, scallops, squid, and octopus. It is located between 83rd and 84th Streets on Amsterdam Avenue.

2) Spicy and Tasty Located in 39-07 Prince Street in Flushing, Queens, where a veritable Hong Kong like neighborhood now exists that has grown bigger than Manhattan’s Chinatown. Here, you hit upon Sichuan (Szechuan)-Chinese style meals that are laced with lots of peppers, Chinese celery, plus chili sauces in its dishes.

3) Szechuan Gourmet Midtown West’s favorite Chinese food place for those seeking a spicy variety of meals, without much salt, not greasy looking, and without MSG. Of course, there are other items on the menu where you can have your favorite food fares that come salty, very spicy, flavorful, or even double cooked. This easily becomes a hangout for office-based workers in Midtown who are craving Chinese food without schlepping to Chinatown during lunchtime.

4) Big Wong King Between Bayard and Canal on Mott Street in Chinatown, this place (also known as “Dai Wong,” which is the name’s translation in Chinese) serves Cantonese cuisine. It always gets crowded with customers who crave noodles, congee, roast pork, roast duck, among others. The experience gets completed in a small, cramped place, with a “not-so” friendly level of service, offered at cheap prices, and yet, all these give the customer an overall sense of having relished authentic Chinese food in the heart of Chinatown itself.

5) Congee Village With current locations at the Lower East Side’s Allen Street, and along Nolita’s Bowery, their house special chicken dubbed as “garlic fragrant chicken” is a must-taste item in their menu. They have other items listed in their extensive menu that has a heavy bent on Cantonese cuisine and running at least 7 pages – a signal that you are in for a great adventure in your search for authentic Chinese cuisine this side of Manhattan, in the fringes of Chinatown.

6) Grand Sichuan International They have 7 locations covering NYC including in Jersey City. If you do not want to spend time to go all the way to Chinatown, and you are somewhere else in NYC, this is the Chinese-food place to go to. Try their spicy dan dan noodles, ma po tofu, dried fried green beans, double-cooked pork, and the fish-flavored eggplant. You’ll also notice a lot of Chinese-looking people having their meals here – a sign that it serves authentic Chinese food.

7) Wo Hop Restaurant Also in Chinatown’s Mott Street where there are other notable Chinese restaurants, you locate this one in the basement. You’d be served with Chinese servers who work on pleasing you and are working to understand what you want to have for your meal. Try to engage your server in a conversation, and he’ll surely lead you to their best offerings depending on your cravings at the moment.

8) Golden Unicorn Located in East Broadway that’s way off from Canal Street, where you may have difficulties finding on-the-street parking in case you bring your car, this is the place to be if you want to enjoy dumplings of all imaginable flavorful varieties in high style. This is a huge restaurant in a building where you may want to bring the rest of your family and friends and be impressed with the experience.

9) Wu Liang Ye Located in Midtown, on 36 W48th Street, close to Times Square and Rockefeller Center, this is a respectable restaurant that is noticeably always packed with customers from all over the town. You will find here authentic Szechuan flavored (i.e. almost always spicy) food fare that will provide you fix for your craving for Chinese food all year through, without the need to go to Chinatown. Also, consult and ask for Mandarin appetizers that you may find difficult to find in other parts of the US.

10) White Bear This (“Bai Xiong” in Mandarin) definitely has to be included here; located at 135-02 Roosevelt Avenue in Flushing, Queens. Experience savoring the most flavorful dumplings and noodles with wontons (reputedly among the best tasting this side of Queens). It is a tiny shack of a food place that offers delicious Mandarin Chinese meals.

The above list includes those that continue to offer what is considered authentic and largely inspired by what can be found in the Mother country. You are assured, too, of the opportunity to enjoy the best in Chinese cuisine that is creatively combined with what is readily found and available in the local culture of NYC.

Jerome Espinosa BaladadArticle by Jerome Espinosa BaladadJerome writes mostly about changes and issues revolving around moving-on themes. You may read more about them, which are mostly written in a personal but daring viewpoint here.

The Chinese Quest welcomes original articles pertaining to the Chinese dining experience.  Your article should pertain to Chinese restaurants, Chinese food, recipes, etc.  For more information, please contact us.

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[REVIEW] Zouji Dumpling House, Glen Cove

Zouji Dumpling House is a relatively new Chinese Restaurant in Glen Cove, NY. If you like it spicy and a little salty it is worth trying. I must say, that if you like it spicy, authentic, and hosts that will make you feel right at home, go check out Zouji Dumpling House this weekend and let us know what you think. The post [REVIEW] Zouji Dumpling House, Glen Cove appeared first on The Chinese...

Seemingly a lifetime ago, pre-COVID-19, we dined at Zouji Dumpling House, at 188 Glen Cove Avenue, in Glen Cove, NY, 11545.  While we wait to find out who will be President in 2020, now is a good time to contemplate what we ate eight months ago.

Time is an interesting phenomenon.  In this crazy COVID world where every day blurs into the next, and every masked face you see looks just like every other masked face.  Hmm.  Pause to think about that for a moment.  What if we didn’t see different skin colors?  Would that end any kind of prejudice, stereotype, jealousy, or hatred?  This isn’t the platform that discussion, however.  We are here to talk about food.

Memories

As memory recalls, though, there was something oddly familiar walking into the Zouji Dumpling House.  I just couldn’t put my finger on it at the time.  But, give it time, and everything becomes clear.

This Chinse Restaurant had me at the facade.  Throwback to the 1970’s or so.  However, the restaurant only opened a few months before, where Tao’s Peking Duck had a brief run. I loved the look.  Sadly, it would be the last look we took inside a Chinese restaurant for nine months. And counting.

There were only four of us there that night, but check out all we ate (all the photos will appear at the end of the dishes in a carousel for your viewing pleasure):

While we perused the menu, asking our Server for their recommendation, they had to prepare us for what was coming.  This little, innocent-looking appetizer set our mouths on fire!  Now that they scalded, err whet our appetite it was time for the main dishes.

Entrees

For those who prefer looking at dishes rather than reading about them, here they are.  But, nothing is quite the same as eating what you read and see:

Pork Soup Dumpling – Way too doughy for our liking, and not enough soup in the dumpling.

Guo Bao Rou (Crispy Pork with Ginger) – this was a lovely dish.  It could have passed for Sweet and Sour.  Of course!  Everything this year is an oxymoron.  So, why not this dish too?

Mongolian Lamb Chop – A staple of Dong Bei (BTW, is it Dong Bei, or Dongbei?) cuisine.  Look at the size of this thing (wait for the picture to come around in the carousel).  They must have realized it was going to be or Last Supper for a while.  Other Dongbei restaurants call this dish Muslim Lamb Chops or Lamb Chops with Cumin.  I’m not sure which is correct, but they all kind of taste the same.  And that is a good thing.

And THEN it clicked.  What was strange became familiar again.  These are the same owners as Zouji in Syosset.  Ya think that the similarity in names might have tipped us off?  Told ya.  These are strange times we are living in.

Beef with Scallion – we started to get an inkling that there was lots of sodium (MSG?) in the dishes.  Another round of drinks for everyone!

Dry Sauteed String Bean – Sadly, this dish was extremely salty and dry.  One of the rare disappointments this night.  The other being that Mee V. Stoogas could not join us.

Just when we could eat no more, they had to bring us a little dessert.

Ho Shao (Baked wheaten (?) cake with Beef) – Like a Jamaican Patty, but Dong Bei style!

By this time we were stuffed and begged off any more dishes.  We begged.  Please just give us the bill and let us waddle back to our cars. Our rating was a mixed bag.

Our Rating:

Rating-Zouji-Dumpling-House-Glen-Cove
I must say, that if you like it spicy, authentic, and hosts that will make you feel right at home, go check out Zouji Dumpling House this weekend and let us know what you think.

 

Humbly submitted for your consumption,

Mee Magnum (“Chop!  Chop!”)

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The post [REVIEW] Zouji Dumpling House, Glen Cove appeared first on The Chinese Quest.


Three Years Ago We Had Something to Laugh About

This post may be more appropriate now, and much needed now, then when it was published exactly three years ago today, as we continue our battle against COVID-19.  COVID-19 is no laughing matter, but for all the people in the world being held "prisoners" in their own homes, and not even being able to order Chinese food delivery?  Now THAT truly is no laughing matter.  So, if a joke in here tickles your funny bone and for a brief moment distracts your mind, it's the least we can do. Stay...

 

If I Couldn’t Laugh…

This post may be more appropriate now, and much needed now, then when it was published exactly three years ago today, as we continue our battle against COVID-19.  COVID-19 is no laughing matter, but for all the people in the world being held “prisoners” in their own homes, and not even being able to order Chinese food delivery?  Now THAT truly is no laughing matter.  So, if a joke in here tickles your funny bone and for a brief moment distracts your mind, it’s the least we can do.

We hope you’ll like to plotz as we did.

oldjewstellingjokes

 

Q: In the Jewish doctrine, when does a fetus become a human?

A: When it graduates from med school.

Q: What’s the difference between a Catholic wife and a Jewish wife?

A: A Catholic wife has real orgasms and fake jewelry.

Q: Why were gentiles invented?

A: Somebody has to pay retail.

Q: Why do Jewish men have to be circumcised?

A: Because a Jewish women wont touch anything unless it’s 20% off

Q: Did you hear about the new tires, Firestein?

A: They not only stop on a dime, they also pick it up!

Q: Define: Genius

A: A “C” student with a Jewish mother.

Jewish people are the most optimistic people in the world. They have some cut off before they even know how big it will get.

Q: How can you tell if someone is half Catholic and half Jewish?

A: When he goes to confession, he takes a lawyer with him.

Q: Where does Moshe hide money from his wife Sadie?

A: Under the vacuum cleaner.

Q: Did you hear about the Jewish ATM?

A: When you take out some money, it says to you, what did you do with the last $50 I gave you?

How does Moses make his tea? Hebrews it. I’m serious. That Israeli how he does it.

A Wife’s Duty

Three men were sitting around bragging about how they had given their new wives duties. The first man had married a Catholic woman and bragged that he had told his wife she was to do all the dishes and house cleaning that needed doing at their house. He said it took a couple days, but on the third day he came home to a clean house and the dishes were all washed and put away.

The second man had married a Mormon woman. He bragged that he had given his wife orders that she was to do all the cleaning, the dishes and the cooking. He told them the first day he didn’t see any results, but the next day it was better. By the third day, the house was clean, the dishes were done, and he had a huge dinner on the table.

The third man had married a Jewish girl. He boasted that he told her that her duties were to keep the house clean, dishes washed, lawn mowed, laundry done and hot meals on the table, every day. He said the first day he didn’t see anything, the second day he didn’t see anything, but by the third day most of the swelling had gone down and he could see a little out of his left eye.

And then the conversation turned to Chinese food…

A Jewish man and a Chinese man were conversing. The Jewish man commented upon what a wise people the Chinese are. “Yes,” replied the Chinese man, “Our culture is over 4,000 years old.

But, you Jews are very wise people, too.” The Jewish man replied, “Yes, our culture is over 5,000 years old.”

The Chinese man was incredulous, “That’s impossible, he replied. Where did your people eat for a thousand years?”

 

Jewish-Christmas-Flyer-620x170

Sid and Al were sitting in a Chinese restaurant. “Sid,” asked Al, “are there any Jews in China?”

“I don’t know,” Sid replied. “Why don’t we ask the waiter?”

When the waiter came by, Al asked him, “Are there any Chinese Jews?”

“I don’t know sir, let me ask,” the waiter replied, and he went into the kitchen. He returned in a few minutes and said, “No, sir. No, Chinese Jews.”

“Are you sure?” Al asked.

“I will check again, sir,” the waiter replied and went back to the kitchen. While he was still gone, Sid said, “I cannot believe there are no Jews in China. Our people are scattered everywhere.”

When the waiter returned he said, “Sir, no Chinese Jews.”

“Are you really sure?” Al asked again.

“I cannot believe there are no Chinese Jews.”

“Sir, I ask everyone,” the waiter replied exasperated. “We have Orange Jews, Prune Jews, Tomato Jews and Grape Jews, but we have no Chinese Jews.”

 

bernbaums

An airplane takes off from the airport. The captain is Jewish and the first officer is Chinese. It’s the first time they’ve flown together and it’s obvious by the silence that they don’t get along. After thirty minutes, the Jewish Captain speaks, “I don’t like Chinese

The First Officer replies, ” Ooooh, no like Chinese? Why ees that?”

The Captain says, “You bombed Pearl Harbor. That’s why I don’t like Chinese.”

The F.O. says, “Nooooo, noooo… Chinese not bomb Pearl Harbah. That Japanese, not Chinese.”

And the Captain answers, “Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese… it doesn’t matter, they’re all alike.” Another thirty minutes of silence.

Finally, the F.O. says, “No like Jew.” The Captain replies, “Why not? Why don’t you like Jews?”

F.O. says, “Jews sink Titanic.” The Captain tries to correct him, “No, no.

The Jews didn’t sink the Titanic. It was an iceberg.” The F.O. replies,” Iceberg, Goldberg, Rosenberg, no mattah. All same.”

 

Do you have a good joke to share with us?   Please post it in the comments below.

Humbly submitted for your consumption,

Mee Magnum (“Chop!  Chop!”)

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The Last Supper – COVID-19 Edition

This review of Mr. Bun Chinese Restaurant in Brooklyn could have stood up on its own. But, because of its timing, and what was going on in the world, the article became, "The Last Supper - COVID-19 Edition". Where are you getting your Chinese food now? The post The Last Supper – COVID-19 Edition appeared first on The Chinese...

Mini Mee and I had what turned to be the Last Supper on Sunday, March 15, 2020, before the chairs were flipped upside down and tables cordoned off for weeks now.  While we were in Brooklyn, picking up some fish at Amazing Aquarium, (which by the way we highly recommend… Great Tropical Fish store, especially for Aquascapers.  Amazing Aquarium is an extremely well-kept store, with very knowledgeable staff.  And, their prices on fish are the lowest we have seen in the tri-state area!), we decided to eat some dinner before the hour-long drive home. 

next-to-the-last-supper

Per a prior recommendation from one of the workers at Amazing Aquarium, I wish I remember her name, we ate for the second time now at Mr. Bun, which is located at 2048 86th St, Brooklyn, NY 11214.  

Mr-Bun-Chinese-Restaurant-Brooklyn

 

The announcements were just coming in, and the Owner was keeping us informed that starting tomorrow, they, and all restaurants in New York City, and soon the announcement extended that to all of New York State,  could only be open for take-out and delivery.  We should have ordered a bunch of dishes to take home.  Who knew it was going to last this long?  We have just learned that like most restaurants, they have temporarily closed until at least April 15th, but likely longer.  How much longer?  No one knows.

The restaurant is whimsically decorated with Anime characters painted on the walls, action figures displayed everywhere, and really cute cartoons posted all over.

(If the slideshow doesn’t start automatically, please hover your mouse over the center of the image and click the play button)

Mr. Bun, as you can imagine, has lots of Dumplings and Buns on their menu, plus lots of really great other dishes.  We sampled quite a few.  We know that the next time we are in the area, we are going to go back again!  Thank you Mr. Bun.  We already miss your Dumplings!

So what was on the menu of our Last Supper, COVID-19 Edition:

 

Soup DumplingsSoup Pork Dumplings

Just absolutely superb.  The soup was steaming hot and not salty.  The pork was plentiful.  The wrapper just the right textures, thickness, and consistency.  The wrapper didn’t break once while lifting it on to the Chinese Soup Spoon.  Grade:  A

Fried-Pork-DumplingsPan-Fried Pork Dumplings

These were as good as I have had.  Perhaps the only place I’ve had better was a Dumpling Galaxy in Flushing. 

Grade:  A

Scallion Pancake with Sliced Beef

Scallion-Pancake-Sliced-BeefWhen made with just the right amount of hoisin sauce, this dish could be my most favorite Chinese dish.  They had the sauce down pat.  There just needed to be a little more beef in the pancake.  Grade:  B

Pan-Fried Pork Bun

Pan-Fried-Pork-BunI was thinking  Char Siu Biao when I ordered this dish.  Not quite the same as I was expecting, but that’s my fault.  The bun was Yum.  I really loved the contrasting texture between the crispier fried base and the softer bun above the fried-line.  There could have been a little more pork inside.  But, overall this was a most satisfying dish.  Grade:  B

An incredibly delicious dinner for just over $20 for two.  Get in line when they re-open.  You’re going to want to go to Mr. Bun!

 

Chopsticks

I apologize for the long gap in posting articles.  I’ve been busy installing, updating, and running anti-virus software on all of my computers.  The good news is that my computer is virus-free and I have a nice backlog of articles to write.

The Dark Ages

dark-ages-jews-chinese-food

A month later, we are still in the Dark Ages.  Dark Ages II for Jews without Chinese food as most Chinese restaurants and take out restaurants decided to close and wait out this Plague.  Lord, please save us from famine.

Stay Strong!  Stay Healthy!!

Humbly submitted for your consumption,

Mee Magnum (“Chop!  Chop!”)

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