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The Chinese Quest

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  • Mee Magnum
  • December 03, 2014 11:14:44 AM

A Little About Us

What started humbly as five friends gathered for a night out, has grown to a quest. A Chinese Quest. Follow along as five hungry Jewish guys search for THE BEST Chinese Restaurant on all of Long Island (and now New York City too)! What do Jews like? A bargain AND Chinese food! It started innocently enough. Now it's become something bigger than even their appetites. Or, has it? So, follow along and let's see where their journey takes them in their search. They welcome your suggestions and feedback. And if you're lucky enough, perhaps they'll ask you to join them on one of their crusades! So pack your chop sticks, we're about to hit the road!

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Three Years Ago We Had Something to Laugh About

This post may be more appropriate now, and much needed now, then when it was published exactly three years ago today, as we continue our battle against COVID-19.  COVID-19 is no laughing matter, but for all the people in the world being held "prisoners" in their own homes, and not even being able to order Chinese food delivery?  Now THAT truly is no laughing matter.  So, if a joke in here tickles your funny bone and for a brief moment distracts your mind, it's the least we can do. Stay...

 

If I Couldn’t Laugh…

This post may be more appropriate now, and much needed now, then when it was published exactly three years ago today, as we continue our battle against COVID-19.  COVID-19 is no laughing matter, but for all the people in the world being held “prisoners” in their own homes, and not even being able to order Chinese food delivery?  Now THAT truly is no laughing matter.  So, if a joke in here tickles your funny bone and for a brief moment distracts your mind, it’s the least we can do.

We hope you’ll like to plotz as we did.

oldjewstellingjokes

 

Q: In the Jewish doctrine, when does a fetus become a human?

A: When it graduates from med school.

Q: What’s the difference between a Catholic wife and a Jewish wife?

A: A Catholic wife has real orgasms and fake jewelry.

Q: Why were gentiles invented?

A: Somebody has to pay retail.

Q: Why do Jewish men have to be circumcised?

A: Because a Jewish women wont touch anything unless it’s 20% off

Q: Did you hear about the new tires, Firestein?

A: They not only stop on a dime, they also pick it up!

Q: Define: Genius

A: A “C” student with a Jewish mother.

Jewish people are the most optimistic people in the world. They have some cut off before they even know how big it will get.

Q: How can you tell if someone is half Catholic and half Jewish?

A: When he goes to confession, he takes a lawyer with him.

Q: Where does Moshe hide money from his wife Sadie?

A: Under the vacuum cleaner.

Q: Did you hear about the Jewish ATM?

A: When you take out some money, it says to you, what did you do with the last $50 I gave you?

How does Moses make his tea? Hebrews it. I’m serious. That Israeli how he does it.

A Wife’s Duty

Three men were sitting around bragging about how they had given their new wives duties. The first man had married a Catholic woman and bragged that he had told his wife she was to do all the dishes and house cleaning that needed doing at their house. He said it took a couple days, but on the third day he came home to a clean house and the dishes were all washed and put away.

The second man had married a Mormon woman. He bragged that he had given his wife orders that she was to do all the cleaning, the dishes and the cooking. He told them the first day he didn’t see any results, but the next day it was better. By the third day, the house was clean, the dishes were done, and he had a huge dinner on the table.

The third man had married a Jewish girl. He boasted that he told her that her duties were to keep the house clean, dishes washed, lawn mowed, laundry done and hot meals on the table, every day. He said the first day he didn’t see anything, the second day he didn’t see anything, but by the third day most of the swelling had gone down and he could see a little out of his left eye.

And then the conversation turned to Chinese food…

A Jewish man and a Chinese man were conversing. The Jewish man commented upon what a wise people the Chinese are. “Yes,” replied the Chinese man, “Our culture is over 4,000 years old.

But, you Jews are very wise people, too.” The Jewish man replied, “Yes, our culture is over 5,000 years old.”

The Chinese man was incredulous, “That’s impossible, he replied. Where did your people eat for a thousand years?”

 

Jewish-Christmas-Flyer-620x170

Sid and Al were sitting in a Chinese restaurant. “Sid,” asked Al, “are there any Jews in China?”

“I don’t know,” Sid replied. “Why don’t we ask the waiter?”

When the waiter came by, Al asked him, “Are there any Chinese Jews?”

“I don’t know sir, let me ask,” the waiter replied, and he went into the kitchen. He returned in a few minutes and said, “No, sir. No, Chinese Jews.”

“Are you sure?” Al asked.

“I will check again, sir,” the waiter replied and went back to the kitchen. While he was still gone, Sid said, “I cannot believe there are no Jews in China. Our people are scattered everywhere.”

When the waiter returned he said, “Sir, no Chinese Jews.”

“Are you really sure?” Al asked again.

“I cannot believe there are no Chinese Jews.”

“Sir, I ask everyone,” the waiter replied exasperated. “We have Orange Jews, Prune Jews, Tomato Jews and Grape Jews, but we have no Chinese Jews.”

 

bernbaums

An airplane takes off from the airport. The captain is Jewish and the first officer is Chinese. It’s the first time they’ve flown together and it’s obvious by the silence that they don’t get along. After thirty minutes, the Jewish Captain speaks, “I don’t like Chinese

The First Officer replies, ” Ooooh, no like Chinese? Why ees that?”

The Captain says, “You bombed Pearl Harbor. That’s why I don’t like Chinese.”

The F.O. says, “Nooooo, noooo… Chinese not bomb Pearl Harbah. That Japanese, not Chinese.”

And the Captain answers, “Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese… it doesn’t matter, they’re all alike.” Another thirty minutes of silence.

Finally, the F.O. says, “No like Jew.” The Captain replies, “Why not? Why don’t you like Jews?”

F.O. says, “Jews sink Titanic.” The Captain tries to correct him, “No, no.

The Jews didn’t sink the Titanic. It was an iceberg.” The F.O. replies,” Iceberg, Goldberg, Rosenberg, no mattah. All same.”

 

Do you have a good joke to share with us?   Please post it in the comments below.

Humbly submitted for your consumption,

Mee Magnum (“Chop!  Chop!”)

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The post Three Years Ago We Had Something to Laugh About appeared first on The Chinese Quest.


The Last Supper – COVID-19 Edition

This review of Mr. Bun Chinese Restaurant in Brooklyn could have stood up on its own. But, because of its timing, and what was going on in the world, the article became, "The Last Supper - COVID-19 Edition". Where are you getting your Chinese food now? The post The Last Supper – COVID-19 Edition appeared first on The Chinese...

Mini Mee and I had what turned to be the Last Supper on Sunday, March 15, 2020, before the chairs were flipped upside down and tables cordoned off for weeks now.  While we were in Brooklyn, picking up some fish at Amazing Aquarium, (which by the way we highly recommend… Great Tropical Fish store, especially for Aquascapers.  Amazing Aquarium is an extremely well-kept store, with very knowledgeable staff.  And, their prices on fish are the lowest we have seen in the tri-state area!), we decided to eat some dinner before the hour-long drive home. 

next-to-the-last-supper

Per a prior recommendation from one of the workers at Amazing Aquarium, I wish I remember her name, we ate for the second time now at Mr. Bun, which is located at 2048 86th St, Brooklyn, NY 11214.  

Mr-Bun-Chinese-Restaurant-Brooklyn

 

The announcements were just coming in, and the Owner was keeping us informed that starting tomorrow, they, and all restaurants in New York City, and soon the announcement extended that to all of New York State,  could only be open for take-out and delivery.  We should have ordered a bunch of dishes to take home.  Who knew it was going to last this long?  We have just learned that like most restaurants, they have temporarily closed until at least April 15th, but likely longer.  How much longer?  No one knows.

The restaurant is whimsically decorated with Anime characters painted on the walls, action figures displayed everywhere, and really cute cartoons posted all over.

(If the slideshow doesn’t start automatically, please hover your mouse over the center of the image and click the play button)

Mr. Bun, as you can imagine, has lots of Dumplings and Buns on their menu, plus lots of really great other dishes.  We sampled quite a few.  We know that the next time we are in the area, we are going to go back again!  Thank you Mr. Bun.  We already miss your Dumplings!

So what was on the menu of our Last Supper, COVID-19 Edition:

 

Soup DumplingsSoup Pork Dumplings

Just absolutely superb.  The soup was steaming hot and not salty.  The pork was plentiful.  The wrapper just the right textures, thickness, and consistency.  The wrapper didn’t break once while lifting it on to the Chinese Soup Spoon.  Grade:  A

Fried-Pork-DumplingsPan-Fried Pork Dumplings

These were as good as I have had.  Perhaps the only place I’ve had better was a Dumpling Galaxy in Flushing. 

Grade:  A

Scallion Pancake with Sliced Beef

Scallion-Pancake-Sliced-BeefWhen made with just the right amount of hoisin sauce, this dish could be my most favorite Chinese dish.  They had the sauce down pat.  There just needed to be a little more beef in the pancake.  Grade:  B

Pan-Fried Pork Bun

Pan-Fried-Pork-BunI was thinking  Char Siu Biao when I ordered this dish.  Not quite the same as I was expecting, but that’s my fault.  The bun was Yum.  I really loved the contrasting texture between the crispier fried base and the softer bun above the fried-line.  There could have been a little more pork inside.  But, overall this was a most satisfying dish.  Grade:  B

An incredibly delicious dinner for just over $20 for two.  Get in line when they re-open.  You’re going to want to go to Mr. Bun!

 

Chopsticks

I apologize for the long gap in posting articles.  I’ve been busy installing, updating, and running anti-virus software on all of my computers.  The good news is that my computer is virus-free and I have a nice backlog of articles to write.

The Dark Ages

dark-ages-jews-chinese-food

A month later, we are still in the Dark Ages.  Dark Ages II for Jews without Chinese food as most Chinese restaurants and take out restaurants decided to close and wait out this Plague.  Lord, please save us from famine.

Stay Strong!  Stay Healthy!!

Humbly submitted for your consumption,

Mee Magnum (“Chop!  Chop!”)

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6 Chinese Regions for Wine Lovers

Chinese wines were once considered exotic and aroused curiosity among specialists, today they are gaining more and more relevance. New wineries are emerging due to bamboo cultivation and some are determined to make premium wines in terms of price and quality. Here are 6 Chinese regions essential to any wine lover The post 6 Chinese Regions for Wine Lovers appeared first on The Chinese...

If Chinese wines were once considered exotic and aroused curiosity among specialists, today they are gaining more and more relevance. China increased its wine production by 50% since 2014 and is now one of the largest producers of wines in the world. New wineries are emerging due to bamboo cultivation and some are determined to make premium wines in terms of price and quality.

Here are 6 Chinese regions essential to any wine lover:

  1. Ningxia

Ningxia is a wine production powerhouse. The wide, heavily irrigated valley between the Yellow River and the base of Helan Mountain has proved to be one of China’s most promising vineyard areas. Ningxia-China-wine-vinyardsA range of wines is made here from grape varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Gernischt and Chardonnay. It is a region with high-quality wines for Chinese standards, in a more Bordeaux style. “In blind tastings with Chinese and French judges, four Ningxia wines among ten reds from the tasting stood out among the Bordeaux”, said Phillip M. Howard, wine expert at Assignment Help and Big Assignments.

  1. Shandong

Shandong is one of the richest provinces in all of China, and one of its pride is the burgeoning wine industry. shandong-chinese-wineMost vineyards are located on slopes facing south, which guarantees better drainage of the excessive water flow. Curiosity: the region is on the same latitude as Bordeaux, in France. The soil is composed of a mixture of gravel and clay, very rich in calcium and minerals. As it has ideal water retention, it results in very good levels of sugar in the berries and potential for wines with higher alcohol content.

  1. Hebei

Located in the northeast of China, most vineyards in Hebei are located in the town of Changli, Qianhuangdao City, bordering Bohai Bay to the east, with Yan Mountain in the north. Though lying on the coast, this region has a continental climate. Hebei-China-WineAffected by the moist air from the sea, there is high humidity during the growing period, increasing the number of sprays needed to combat disease and rot.

Vineyards are planted on differing soils. First are the vineyards on low mountains and rolling hills to the north that have brown soils with a great amount of sand. Second, there are vineyards in the central and south, with infertile sandy soils. Finally, the vineyards on the eastern coast have light loam soils. Cabernet Sauvignon is the dominant variety, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Longyan, and Chardonnay are also planted in a small volume.

  1. Xinjiang

Bordering Mongolia, Russia, and Kazakhstan, Xinjiang produces grapes with very deep color and high sugar content. 

xinjiang-china-wine-grapes

This region is extremely dry, with average monthly rainfall at 22 millimeters during the growing season. Water from the snow of Tianshan mountain is used for irrigation. The soils are deep and well-drained gravel and Sandy soils. Popular red varieties are Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Syrah, Pinot Noir. Popular white Varieties include Pinot Blanc, Chenin Blanc, Uni Blanc, and Yan73.

  1. Yunnan

Located in the southwest of China, lying at the far eastern edge of the Himalayan uplift, bordering Tibet to the west, and the countries Vietnam, Laos, and Myanmar to the south, Yunnan-Chinese-WineYunnan covers an area as large as Switzerland. In 2000, Yunnan Shangri-la Wine company purchased and processed the grapes from the farmers in exchange for being granted a monopoly on all Yunnan grapes. Attracted by the favorable terroir for wine grapes, Moët Hennessy in cooperation with the Chinese liqueur producer VATS, “established Moët Hennessy Shangri-La Winery Company in this area in 2012, who mainly produce Bordeaux blends”, says Rachael Burke, writer at State Of Writing and UK Essay Writing Services.

  1. Shanxi

Shanxi is an important wine-producing province in eastern China. It covers a mountainous plateau between the western desert and the coastal plain. The wines are made predominantly from Cabernet Sauvignon, Muscat, Chardonnay, and Merlot. Shanxi-Chinese-wineGrace Vineyards is Shanxi’s best-known grower and is one of China’s most highly regarded producers in terms of quality. Its Shanxi vineyards are located on the deep sandy loam soils outside of Taiyuan, where excellent drainage allows the vines to grow deep root systems, encouraging the health of the vine.

China has been producing wine for over two thousand years, but they were reserved for consumption at the Emperor’s Palace and for religious rituals. With the economic development of recent years, the Chinese have started to consume and drink more and better.

Chinese-wine

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Beatrix Potter works as a China expert at Top Asian writing services and Best Essay Services writing services, as well as an online proofreader at Top Canadian Writers website. Beatrix writes about Chinese culture in general but holds a fascination for the topic of Buddhism in China. She has given several presentations about it and is currently learning Mandarin.

The Chinese Quest welcomes original articles pertaining to the Chinese dining experience.  Your article should pertain to Chinese restaurants, Chinese food, recipes, etc.  For more information, please contact us.

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5 Debunked Myths On Chinese Cuisine

The Chinese culture has already taken the world by storm with its yummy foods and cuisines. Because of that, people tend to believe things about Chinese food that actually turn out to be misconceptions, whether they’re plain silly or simply incorrect. But can you really trust these myths? The post 5 Debunked Myths On Chinese Cuisine appeared first on The Chinese...

The Chinese culture has already taken the world by storm with its yummy foods and cuisines. Because of that, people tend to believe things about Chinese food that actually turn out to be misconceptions, whether they’re plain silly or simply incorrect. But can you really trust these myths?

Don’t you worry! We compiled a list of Chinese food myths that have been debunked. Get ready for the shockers!

  1. It Leaves You Hungry

Have you ever eaten Chinese food in large portions? If so, you would’ve most likely come across the myth that Chinese food always leaves you hungry, right? Well, think again!

“This myth is based solely on the historical fact that the Chinese used to cook small portions, in comparison to many Western cultures,” said Jacob K. Santillo, a lifestyle blogger at Studydemic.com and Academized.com “Thus, the food that the Chinese would eat – food that lacked nutrition, and wasn’t a good portion size – would never be that filling. Luckily, the portion sizes have grown since then and leave people full instead of feeling hunger pangs at the end. And nowadays, Chinese cuisine accounts for both protein and fiber, which keeps your hunger pangs under control.”

  1. On The Menu: Dog And Cat

Sure, Chinese restaurants may feature specialties like frog, rabbit, duck, etc on the menu. Or, in some parts of China, you might find a dog or cats as menu items. So, it’s easy to assume that Chinese food can be weird and/or disgusting at times, making foodies either curious or second-guessing it.

However, this myth is touch and go at this point in time. With the active protests against the consumption of dog meat from animal rights groups on the rise, and that it’s been gaining unpopularity over the years, this myth might soon be a thing of the past. 

  1. Soy Sauce Always Contains… Soy!

Don’t be fooled! Just because it says “soy sauce” on the label, doesn’t mean that it contains soy. In other words, beware of imitations!

In America, the little plastic packets of soy sauce have virtually nothing to do with having soy in it. In fact, these “soy sauce” packets are actually a mixture of syrup and food coloring, which give off the convincing appearance of the sauce.

On the other hand, the authentic version of soy sauce can only be found in China and Japan, because they tend to brew their sauce from actual soybeans. So, if you have a craving for soy sauce, but want the real stuff instead of imitations, then find a grocery store in China or Japan.

  1. Point Me To P.F. Chang’s!

ActuallyP.F. Chang was the West’s response in welcoming Chinese food, making it a mainstream restaurant chain, instead of an authentic industry straight out of China. 

In fact, you won’t find a P.F. Chang’s in China.

P.F. Chang's China BistroWhat draws people to trying Chinese cuisine is the idea that it can either be sweet, vinegary, spicy or a combination of each. Thus, the adventurous foodie would consider Cantonese, Hunan, and Sichuan foods that China has to offer – but can’t he/she have it in the US? Yes and no – but most likely no, because Chinese restaurants in the US tend to use substitutions, rather than the authentic ingredients. So, it’s safe to say that authentic Chinese food from China will taste different than the Chinese food produced in the US.

  1. Fortune Cookies Came From China

“Fortune cookies did not come from China,” said Samuel Rose, a food blogger at Simplegrad.com and Uktopwriters.com “They were actually started in the United States. Fortune-CookiesBefore World War I, Japanese immigrants first made these cookies in their bakeries. Eventually, the cookies grew in popularity, with many Chinese restaurants replicating the recipe and selling it to the masses. One company, in the ‘90s, had tried taking their fortune cookies to start a business in China, but the Chinese weren’t interested since the product was ‘too American’ for them. Thus, the fortune cookie craze can be found mainly in the US.”

To be fair, the Chinese had their own cookies that had fortunes scribed onto a piece of paper, but their cookies looked and tasted different than the Americanized fortune cookies.

Conclusion

Were you baffled by the Chinese food myths that were debunked? If so, then now you know! So, go ahead and enjoy your favorite foods that China has to offer! Happy eating!

Molly Crockett writes for Bigassignments.com and Oxessays.com, as well as contributes to online sites, such as Eliteassignmenthelp.com online writing service. As a travel blogger, she enjoys sharing her experiences and her latest personal development ideas.

The Chinese Quest welcomes original articles pertaining to the Chinese dining experience.  Your article should pertain to Chinese restaurants, Chinese food, recipes, etc.  For more information, please contact us.

Please share this article if you enjoyed it! click-to-share

The post 5 Debunked Myths On Chinese Cuisine appeared first on The Chinese Quest.


10 Surprising Chinese Foods and Ingredients

There are many differences between Western culture and Chinese culture, and once you venture into their land, you will definitely see that food is one of them. Chinese food culture revolves around wasting as little food as possible and using every material available. Because of that, we are bound to find some surprising ingredients in their food. Let us know if you have used any of these ingredients, and if you plan on trying some now! The post 10 Surprising Chinese Foods and Ingredients...

There are many differences between Western culture and Chinese culture, and once you venture into their land, you will definitely see that food is one of them. Chinese food culture revolves around wasting as little food as possible and using every material available. Because of that, we are bound to find some surprising ingredients in their food, that we might have never thought about trying, let alone using in our own kitchen. 

1. Bones

Eating meat off the bones is not such a foreign concept for westerners, but even so, they might be taken aback by the frequent use of bones in Chinese food. Any types of bones, from chicken and pork to ducks can be used, and they are considered an essential ingredient in most foods. What might seem strange is that the bones are cut with the meat altogether, leaving the shards of bone in the food for you to find.

The Chinese believe that the meat found closest to the bone is the tastiest, which is why they leave the smallest bones inside the meal. Not only that but by cutting the bones the marrow is released into the dish, making it tastier and healthier.

2. Bamboo shoots

This is a very common ingredient in Chinese cuisine. Bamboo shoots can be seen on any bamboo stand, at the base of the plant. Bamboo stalks can also be eaten, although they are slightly drier. Ingredients that come from bamboo are considered extremely beneficial for one’s health, as they have lots of minerals and proteins, and are very low on sugar.

3. Lotus roots

Another well-known ingredient for food, lotus roots has a very firm texture before they are cooked. However, “taste and texture are very similar to lettuce leaves,” says Susan Snowden, lifestyle writer at Draftbeyond and Lastminutewriting. You can easily recognize this ingredient by its circular shape, and the holes found in the middle after it is cut.

4. Deep-fried scorpions

This very unique street food dish is fairly popular in China. You can eat it whole, with its sting still attached, as the frying process destroys the poison inside. If deep-fried scorpions are a bit too much for you, you can always consider other types of insects such as cicadas, which supposedly taste like nuts, or even ants, which have a tangy, acidic taste comparable to limes.

5. Snake soup

A very popular dish in Hong Kong, snake soup is also considered a very gourmet dish, and many people love eating it especially during winter to warm up. It is usually served with shredded snakes inside the soup itself, but people claim it tastes just like chicken.

6. Roasted street birds and whole pigeons

You will probably see this a lot if you explore local street food places in China. Do not be scared by their appearance: they taste very good, as they are prepared in a tasty marinade and roasted afterward.

7. Balut

Another unique dish, that many people may have trouble bringing themselves to try is Balut. Famous in other countries such as the Philippines, Cambodia or Vietnam, Balut is essentially a duck embryo, boiled and eaten from the shell. Many locals prefer tipping the top of the eggshell and sipping on the liquid inside afterward.

8. Dried lily flowers

This is another ingredient Chinese people love to use, especially in vegetarian food. “It is used as a flavor enhancer, and on its own, it tends to have an earthy flavor. Just like bamboo shoots, dried lily flowers bring a crunchy, chewy texture to every dish they are mixed in”, claims Margaret Garret, food blogger at Writinity and Researchpapersuk.

9. Bitter melon

This vegetable can certainly be considered an acquired taste, as it is a distinctively bitter ingredient. It resembles a wrinkly old cucumber, and it is used in a lot of vegetarian dishes but not only.

Chinese people love using really healthy ingredients in their foods, and bitter melon is no exception, as it is considered to be good for your heart, good for people with diabetes and supposedly good for preventing Alzheimer’s.

10. Dried wood ear mushrooms

 

You must have this ingredient if you wish to experiment with cooking traditional Chinese dishes. It is commonly used in popular dishes such as moo shu stir-fry, egg rolls, noodle gravy, and various soups, as it adds a lot of texture. Although they don’t have any particular taste by themselves, wood ear mushrooms will absorb the flavor of the other ingredients.

For Westerners, these might seem like very unconventional ingredients for cooking. However, you should definitely give them a try during your visit to China, or even just in your own kitchen, if they are available to you.

Author Bio:

Margot M. Foster is a writer at LuckyAssignments.com and GumEssays.com, where she shares her passion and knowledge about cooking and national cuisines.

The Chinese Quest welcomes original articles pertaining to the Chinese dining experience.  Your article should pertain to Chinese restaurants, Chinese food, recipes, etc.  For more information, please contact us.

Please share this article if you enjoyed it! click-to-share

The post 10 Surprising Chinese Foods and Ingredients appeared first on The Chinese Quest.


Chinese Dining Customs and All You Need to Know About Them

Every culture has its own customs regarding eating, especially when it involves a bigger event such as a family dinner or a party. Chinese customs differ from Western ones, and here are the most important differences you need to know. The post Chinese Dining Customs and All You Need to Know About Them appeared first on The Chinese...

Every culture has its own customs regarding eating, especially when it involves a bigger event such as a family dinner or a party. Chinese customs differ from Western ones, and here are the most important differences you need to know:

Seating arrangements

One thing that sets apart Western dining culture and the Chinese one is the difference in seating arrangements. This might seem like a small detail, but a lot of different customs come from the different shapes of the tables: Chinese restaurants often prefer using round tables, as opposed to the rectangular ones used in Western cultures. Because of that, the most important seat at the table is thought to be the one facing the entrance of the restaurant or household, as opposed to the head of the table. This is where the guest of honor is seated, and the closer you sit to them, the more important of a guest you are considered. In cases where there is no doorway, the guest of honor will be facing east, while in the case of banquets, they will sit at the table farthest away from the entrance.

Usually, the meal can only start after all the guests have arrived. “The meal seems to be directed by the person sitting in the seat of honor”, states Andrew Medina, language tutor at Britstudent.com and Writemyx.com. People are not allowed to sit down before the guest of honor. More than that, they will have the responsibility of signaling the start of a meal, and it is seen as rude to start eating before they do.

Chopsticks

There are many customs related to the use of chopsticks in China. You should not use chopsticks to stab or skewer food, and you should not wave them in the air too much while talking. “You should also avoid pointing your chopsticks at other people, as it is seen as a sign of aggression and disrespect,” says Michel Simmons, lifestyle blogger at Australia2write.com and Nextcoursework.com.

In many cases, there are serving spoons and chopsticks to help you take food from the central dishes, as it is seen as rude and unhygienic to pick food with chopsticks that have been near one’s mouth. Knives and forks will not be provided unless you specifically request them.

Another important detail to remember is to never stick your chopsticks vertically into the food. This is seen as a symbol of bad luck, as people associate it with a Chinese funeral custom: usually, people put a bowl of rice onto the ancestor’s altar and put sticks of incense vertically on top of it.

Table manners

A lot of the customs one should pay attention to during dining are similar to Western ones. However, in China you need to be extremely mindful of these manners, as doing the opposite is seen as a personal offense towards the guest of honor.

In Chinese culture, food is ordered by the host and is served in big plates from which everyone picks smaller portions to eat. It is seen as rude to take food from a plate that is too far away from you. During the meal, it is important to remember to savor the dish in front of you, instead of eating it quickly.

During a meal, you should always be more concerned about others than about yourself. When refilling your rice bowl, you should take initiative and fill the bowls of others at your table as well. More than that, if one of the plates is almost empty, you should never take the last piece before consulting others. Only if nobody else wants it, it is okay to eat.

These meals are important to the Chinese people, and it is seen as disrespectful to engage in other activities such as watching TV, looking at your phone or simply not take part in the conversations.

Paying

In Chinese culture, splitting the bill is a foreign concept. The guest of honor is expected to offer to pay the bill but will not be allowed. It is important to not question this decision too much, but make sure to express your gratitude at the end of the meal.

 

Although there seems to be a lot of pressure on following the right customs, it is also important to remember to enjoy yourself at such social events. If you pay attention to what others are doing, you will definitely manage to behave respectfully.

Author Bio:

Michael DehoyosMichael Dehoyos works at the Phd Kingdom and Academic brits, as a content marketer and editor, and also as a writer at Origin Writings. He has helped many companies develop marketing strategies and has contributed to many publications. 

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