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The Chinese Quest

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  • Mee Magnum
  • December 03, 2014 11:14:44 AM

A Little About Us

What started humbly as five friends gathered for a night out, has grown to a quest. A Chinese Quest. Follow along as five hungry Jewish guys search for THE BEST Chinese Restaurant on all of Long Island (and now New York City too)! What do Jews like? A bargain AND Chinese food! It started innocently enough. Now it's become something bigger than even their appetites. Or, has it? So, follow along and let's see where their journey takes them in their search. They welcome your suggestions and feedback. And if you're lucky enough, perhaps they'll ask you to join them on one of their crusades! So pack your chop sticks, we're about to hit the road!

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Chinese Dining Customs and All You Need to Know About Them

Every culture has its own customs regarding eating, especially when it involves a bigger event such as a family dinner or a party. Chinese customs differ from Western ones, and here are the most important differences you need to know. The post Chinese Dining Customs and All You Need to Know About Them appeared first on The Chinese...

Every culture has its own customs regarding eating, especially when it involves a bigger event such as a family dinner or a party. Chinese customs differ from Western ones, and here are the most important differences you need to know:

Seating arrangements

One thing that sets apart Western dining culture and the Chinese one is the difference in seating arrangements. This might seem like a small detail, but a lot of different customs come from the different shapes of the tables: Chinese restaurants often prefer using round tables, as opposed to the rectangular ones used in Western cultures. Because of that, the most important seat at the table is thought to be the one facing the entrance of the restaurant or household, as opposed to the head of the table. This is where the guest of honor is seated, and the closer you sit to them, the more important of a guest you are considered. In cases where there is no doorway, the guest of honor will be facing east, while in the case of banquets, they will sit at the table farthest away from the entrance.

Usually, the meal can only start after all the guests have arrived. “The meal seems to be directed by the person sitting in the seat of honor”, states Andrew Medina, language tutor at Britstudent.com and Writemyx.com. People are not allowed to sit down before the guest of honor. More than that, they will have the responsibility of signaling the start of a meal, and it is seen as rude to start eating before they do.

Chopsticks

There are many customs related to the use of chopsticks in China. You should not use chopsticks to stab or skewer food, and you should not wave them in the air too much while talking. “You should also avoid pointing your chopsticks at other people, as it is seen as a sign of aggression and disrespect,” says Michel Simmons, lifestyle blogger at Australia2write.com and Nextcoursework.com.

In many cases, there are serving spoons and chopsticks to help you take food from the central dishes, as it is seen as rude and unhygienic to pick food with chopsticks that have been near one’s mouth. Knives and forks will not be provided unless you specifically request them.

Another important detail to remember is to never stick your chopsticks vertically into the food. This is seen as a symbol of bad luck, as people associate it with a Chinese funeral custom: usually, people put a bowl of rice onto the ancestor’s altar and put sticks of incense vertically on top of it.

Table manners

A lot of the customs one should pay attention to during dining are similar to Western ones. However, in China you need to be extremely mindful of these manners, as doing the opposite is seen as a personal offense towards the guest of honor.

In Chinese culture, food is ordered by the host and is served in big plates from which everyone picks smaller portions to eat. It is seen as rude to take food from a plate that is too far away from you. During the meal, it is important to remember to savor the dish in front of you, instead of eating it quickly.

During a meal, you should always be more concerned about others than about yourself. When refilling your rice bowl, you should take initiative and fill the bowls of others at your table as well. More than that, if one of the plates is almost empty, you should never take the last piece before consulting others. Only if nobody else wants it, it is okay to eat.

These meals are important to the Chinese people, and it is seen as disrespectful to engage in other activities such as watching TV, looking at your phone or simply not take part in the conversations.

Paying

In Chinese culture, splitting the bill is a foreign concept. The guest of honor is expected to offer to pay the bill but will not be allowed. It is important to not question this decision too much, but make sure to express your gratitude at the end of the meal.

 

Although there seems to be a lot of pressure on following the right customs, it is also important to remember to enjoy yourself at such social events. If you pay attention to what others are doing, you will definitely manage to behave respectfully.

Author Bio:

Michael DehoyosMichael Dehoyos works at the Phd Kingdom and Academic brits, as a content marketer and editor, and also as a writer at Origin Writings. He has helped many companies develop marketing strategies and has contributed to many publications. 

The Chinese Quest welcomes original articles pertaining to the Chinese dining experience.  Your article should pertain to Chinese restaurants, Chinese food, recipes, etc.  For more information, please contact us.

Please share this article if you enjoyed it! click-to-share

The post Chinese Dining Customs and All You Need to Know About Them appeared first on The Chinese Quest.


Happy New Year! The Year of the Rat

Happy Chinese New Year! ~ 恭喜發財 ~ Gung Hay Fat Choy!! In the Chinese Zodiac, 2020 is the Year of the Rat. Learn why Rats are clever and quick thinkers, successful but content with living quiet and peaceful lives. The post Happy New Year! The Year of the Rat appeared first on The Chinese...

A few years ago, our dear friend Bernadette King wrote a series of articles for The Chinese Quest about the Chinese Zodiac. This was the article she wrote about “The Year of the Rat“.

Gung Hay Fat Choy! ~ 恭喜發財 ~ Happy New Year!!

Year of the Rat Chinese Zodiac Rat

Those born in the Year of the Rat manage a budget like none others. Their aptitude for numbers is remarkable.

Another amazing personality trait of this Zodiac Sign is their quick-mindedness that applies to nearly any situation they encounter, making them highly successful in life.

The Chinese Rat has charm but they have no issue with being frank when necessary, using their nearly photographic memory as a record of who, what and when.

This Chinese Zodiac animal can skitter out of the way of trouble, using their naturally anxious energy, and they’re also very adept at hiding personal secrets in a proverbial mouse hole. Nearly conversely, other people’s secrets become “public domain” for the Rat’s sharp teeth.

Some of the keynotes of the Rat personality include watchfulness, energy, humor, tidiness, and flexibility. They have a work ethic par none and use it to feed their hunger for material things. Rats have natural curiosity but also have a fearful side that holds them back. Even with all this, Rats do not make good leaders because people consider them inflexible.

Chinese Zodiac Rat Compatibility

In terms of relationships, as a Chinese Rat you take love to heart, literally. They love their home to be filled with good food and pleasant partners.

In terms of love compatibility, the Rat generally pairs best with the Chinese Monkey and Chinese Dragon.

Chinese Zodiac Rat Children

If you’ve given birth to a Rat, this child is smart as a whip and highly socialized. They have strong verbal and written communication skills, and adore books. Wait, you’ll find that pile under the bed complete with a flashlight or two.

The key struggle with the Rat is a tendency to want to keep things (and people) for themselves. Sharing isn’t one of their best attributes unless its absolutely equitable.

Metaphysical Associations

The Chinese Rat’s metaphysical correspondences in this astrological system include the Color Red, Direction of North and Master Number 11 in Numerology.

Chinese Zodiac Posts supplied by The Chinese Quest Groupie – Lucky Mee (Bernadette King of BuildingBeautifulSouls.com).

Learn more about the Chinese Zodiac Sign of Rat.

Delve into the symbolism and meaning of the Color Red, the Direction of North and Master Number 11 in Numerology.

The post Happy New Year! The Year of the Rat appeared first on The Chinese Quest.


The Top 7 Mistakes People Make When Eating at Chinese Restaurants

Even if you’ve been eating Chinese food for years, or you’re just discovering how amazing it is, everyone could use some lessons in Chinese food etiquette and how to avoid the top mistakes that people make when eating this food. What better way to honor and respect the Chinese culture than to make sure you’re appreciating the food traditions and culture. Read on for the top 7 mistakes and suggestions so you can make sure you’re treating this food right. The post The Top 7 Mistakes...

Chinese food is an incredibly popular foreign food that everyone loves to eat, from college students to working professionals. It’s delicious, for starters, but it’s also often very cheap, delivers almost everywhere, and it’s usually open on holidays. Even if you’ve been eating Chinese food for years, or you’re just discovering how amazing it is, everyone could use some lessons in Chinese food etiquette and how to avoid the top mistakes that people make when eating this food. What better way to honor and respect the Chinese culture than to make sure you’re appreciating the food traditions and culture. Read on for the top mistakes and suggestions so you can make sure you’re treating this food right.

1. Split multiple dishes with the whole table

Chinese-Food-Family-Style

Similarly to many other Asian cultures, when eating Chinese food, the best way to enjoy it is to eat it family style. That means you should be ordering a lot of different types of food with your dining partners so everyone can have a little taste of all there is to offer. Don’t make the mistake of ordering only one thing for yourself and not sharing, since that’s a big faux-pas.

2. Keep your feet firmly on the floor during the meal

It might seem obvious to some, but a lot of people still tend to make this mistake. In Chinese culture, showing the bottom of your feet is a sign of extreme disrespect. According to Tammy Ludlow, a food blogger at Australian Help and Paper Fellows, “in Buddhist culture, your head is the part of your body that is the holiest, whereas your feet are considered the dirtiest and the lowest. That’s why you should always keep your feet on the ground, because if you’re positioning the soles of your feet toward someone, they may get extremely insulted.”

3. Use your chopsticks only for eating, and nothing else

There’s always one person who will use their chopsticks for drumming on the table or for pointing at people and things. This is a big no-no and considered rude in pretty much any culture. Chopsticks are for eating only, for moving the food from your plate or your bowl to your mouth. You wouldn’t start drumming with spoons and forks in public, so don’t do it with chopsticks. You also shouldn’t be sticking your chopsticks straight down in your food. When chopsticks are sticking upright in your food dish, that represents death. Chinese people, including your server, could take this to mean that you’re wishing ill on them, so avoid doing this.

In another chopstick etiquette, you shouldn’t be separating your set. Don’t use one only to stab pieces of food – always use two to pick up your food. Similarly, if one falls to the ground, just get another full set.

4. Serve food and drink in the right order

Serving tea is all about respect. You should always follow tradition and start by serving the eldest first. If you’re the one serving the tea, you should always be serving yourself last. When you pour, hold the lid at the same time.

5. Thank the host or server

xie-xie-thank-you

It’s important to remember to thank the host or server and show your appreciation. You can do this by tapping your index and middle fingers on the table, which is accepted in Southern Chinese culture. You can also nod and say thank you, which will be recognized in any culture.

6. licking-plate-cleanDon’t clean off your plate

As per Rob Ghali, a lifestyle writer at Academized and State of Writing, “if you eat every single bite of food on your plate, it will give the message that you’re hungry and the host did not give you enough food. However, if you’re leaving a few morsels behind, don’t leave just rice as this is considered rude as well.”

7. Tipping is complicated

Tipping is a tricky situation. If you’re in China, tips are not customary and you should not be leaving one. However, if you’re eating at a Chinese restaurant in North America, you should be tipping when you pay.

tipping

These tips and suggestions are all about respect. When you show that you’re going out of your way to respect another culture, it goes a long way.

Author Bio:
Ellie Coverdale is a lifestyle writer at UK Writings and Essayroo. She enjoys traveling and sharing her experiences with her audience. Her passion for traveling is about exploring new cultures and learning about history and tradition. Ellie also teaches writing classes at Boom Essays.

The Chinese Quest welcomes original articles pertaining to the Chinese dining experience.  Your article should pertain to Chinese restaurants, Chinese food, recipes, etc.  For more information, please contact us.

Please share this article if you enjoyed it! click-to-share

The post The Top 7 Mistakes People Make When Eating at Chinese Restaurants appeared first on The Chinese Quest.


A Very Mellow (Mild) Christmas!

Every year at Christmas, Jews all over the world seek out a good movie and Chinese food. The Chinese Quest offers these five recommendations of Cantonese Chinese restaurants for a mellow Christmas Day feast. Here are our recommendations for the Top Five best Cantonese style Chinese restaurants on Long Island and New York City plus a bonus selection of a Kosher Chinese restaurant. So of all we recommended these past few days, which Chinese restaurant are you going to? The post A Very Mellow...

The other day, we posted our Top 5 Szechuan / Dongbei, i.e VERY spicy Chinese restaurant recommendations for you (Jews) to enjoy on Christmas Day.  By the way, of course, you can enjoy any of these Chinese restaurants ANY day of the year.  But, for those (Jews) who don’t have anything else to do on Christmas Day but go to the movies and eat Chinese food, these posts are for you!

And for those of you that spice isn’t nice to your stomach, we present to you our…

Top 5 Cantonese Style Chinese Restaurants!

You can click on our complete review of each restaurant by clicking on the name of the Chinese restaurant.

#5 – Lake Pavilion in Flushing

Lake-Pavilion-Flushing-New-YorkOn most nights the restaurant is totally packed, and the line to get in for Dim Sum on weekends is out the door.  What more can one say about this bastion to Chinese food at the intersection of the Long Island Expressway and Main Street.   And you can’t miss their sign even if your speeding (like that will ever happen!) past the exit on the Expressway.

Some of the dishes we highly recommend:

  • Peking Duck – PERFECT!  What more can I say?  The duck skins, served in the buns, with scallions and hoisin sauce.  Perfect!  (The rest of the duck was served in a separate platter.  I didn’t try the remainder as duck tends to be fatty and I have a sensitive stomach.  The other Mee’s liked it)
  • Sauteed Lobster with ginger and scallions (Two lobsters) – OMG, this could have been the best lobster I have ever had.  I couldn’t get enough.  It melted in your mouth.
  • Sauteed Scallops In Black Pepper Sauce  – Scrumdelicious!  I don’t know if that’s a word, but I don’t know how else to describe it.  The sauce was beyond belief.  I couldn’t get enough.  The broccoli with the sauce.  Kudos to the Chef!

#4 – Pearl East in Manhasset

pearl-east-chinese-restaurantCatering to the well-heeled clientele of the Gold Coast of Long Island, Pearl East never disappoints. Though not visually appealing from the outside, it presented quite a different ambiance on the inside.  Pure opulence, class, quality, gilt, and more.  Please note that since our initial review, Pearl East has changed its signage on the restaurant and by the entrance on Northern Boulevard.  The new signage is much more in line with their upscale style.

Pearl East features Cantonese cuisine served in a manner most fitting a royal banquet.

#3 – LN 1380 in Little Neck

LN1380-Dim-Sum-Seafood-HouseThe days of having to travel into Chinatown for a great meal are long gone. As the Asian population migrates east, they are bringing with them the many cuisines of China.  Long Islanders will only benefit from this great culinary migration.  LN 1380 was one of the early examples of that migration, and it has sure stood the test of time as the restaurant has been packed every time I passed it.

You will most definitely want to read our entire review of LN 1380 to know why we highly recommend it!

#2 – Asian Jewels Seafood Restaurant in Flushing

Asian Jewels Seafood Chinese RestaurantFrom the moment that you see Asian Jewels Seafood Restaurant, you feel like you’re walking into someplace special.  The place was immaculate.  The service was meticulous.  The waiters were attentive.  And, the bathrooms were the best I have ever seen.  We highly recommend for appetizers, Salt & Pepper Fried Squid (This dish, in my humble opinion, made the night.  The Squid wasn’t what you’d find in a fried calamari, but tasted more like shrimp.  It was a huge winner and got our meal off to a galloping start), Vietnamese Shredded Chicken, Crispy Spare Ribs.  

After completely whetting our appetite for our entrees, we recommend Lobster w/Black Bean Sauce  (most excellent! The lobsters were 1 1/4lbs.  We had two.  The lobster was already cut up into pieces and was relatively easy to get out of the shell.  Which we greedily picked up to get each piece of succulent lobster meat into our appreciative bellies), Duck w/Taro, Sea Bass w/Vegetables, Crystal Crab Meat Fried Rice, and, House Special Fried Rice.

Drum roll, please…

#1 – You Garden Xiao Long Bao in Bayside

you-garden-xiao-long-bao-chinese-restaurantThis still relatively new Bayside location is owned by the same people who own Shanghai You Garden Dumpling House in Flushing, NY

People have claimed that Shanghai You Garden Dumpling House has the best soup dumplings in New York.

What’s different?  It’s larger.  The restaurant’s capacity is 50% larger than in Flushing.  What hasn’t changed?  The food.  No, wait.  That’s changed too.  Change is the wrong word.  It hasn’t changed.  It has everything that Flushing has and more!  More? 

The menu is like 30 pages long.  They added a whole page of Cold Dishes.  Cold Appetizers.  You could dine here 100 times and never eat the same dish twice.

Chopsticks

And for those of you who keep Kosher, we offer you this bonus selection:

Cho-Sen Island in Lawrence

Cho-Sen-IslandCho-Sen Island is Glatt Kosher. Some of the dishes are extremely expensive (yet paradoxically, when we ate there, our bill was way lower than we expected.  Mee’s do love getting a bargain.  And, good food!)

And the food WAS good.  Surprisingly good.  A LOT better than some of the other Chinese restaurants we’ve been to.

A few complaints… the sauces tasted exactly the same on a few of our dishes.  And, our taste buds detected a lot of sodium.

We left full, bloated in fact (none of us were hungry an hour later… I purposely waited not to post this review for 24 hours just to see when we’d get hungry again).  There were leftovers as the food was very filling.  But, we didn’t fight over who was NOT going to take it.  It was taken home gleefully.

Chopsticks

And if none of these tickle your fancy, or aren’t geographically desirable, please check our Ranking of the Best Chinese Restaurants on Long Island and New York City.  You can click on “Cuisine” on the menu, and it will sort all the restaurants by the Chinese cuisine of your choice!

‘Twas the week before Christmas, when all through the shul
Not a creature was stirring, not even a mule;
The shmatas were hung by their menorah with care,
In hopes that their Christmas Dinner soon would be there;
The children were nestled all snug in their beds;
While visions of Chinese food danced in their heads;

We wish everyone a very Merry Christmas, a Happy Chanukah, and best wishes for a Happy, Healthy, Prosperous, and Safe New year!

Humbly submitted for your consumption,

Mee Magnum (“Chop!  Chop!”)

P.S.  Please note, we have not verified that all of these Chinese restaurants are in fact open on Christmas Day, so please call now to confirm, and to make a reservation!  If not, you can always try them another day.

Please share this article so others can enjoy it! click-to-share

The post A Very Mellow (Mild) Christmas! appeared first on The Chinese Quest.


A Very Spicy (Jewish) Christmas

Every year at Christmas, Jews all over the world seek out a good movie and Chinese food. The Chinese Quest offers these five recommendations of Szechuan Chinese restaurants to spice up YOUR Christmas. Here are our recommendations for the five best Szechuan style Chinese restaurants on Long Island and New York City. Which Chinese restaurant are you going to? The post A Very Spicy (Jewish) Christmas appeared first on The Chinese...

Take a Wok on the wild and Spicy side this Christmas.  If you’re Jewish.  If you’re Jewish, you are going to the movies and then out for Chinese Food.  The Chinese Quest is right there with you with some top-notch recommendations to make this Christmas the best Christmas ever.  And if you want to make it the spiciest Christmas ever, you’re palate is going to crave Szechuan cuisine.

First, let’s go to the movies with the Chinese Quest.  Since I’ve only been to the movies once in the last few years, but thankfully recently, I have a great movie recommendation for you.  Ford v Ferrari.  Loved it!  It’s not just a guy movie.  True, there’s lots of action.  There’s also a love story intertwined in the plot.  In fact, there’s only one thing I felt was missing in the movie.  Chinese food.  Not once did they eat Chinese food.  Why?  I think I know why.  Back in 1966, there was no Chinese Quest.  So, they had no idea where the best Chinese restaurants were.  Luckily you do!  Aren’t you lucky?  Don’t you feel blessed now?

All this talk about food is making me hungry.  Presented now for your consideration is our ranking of…

The 5 Best Szechuan Chinese Restaurants on Long Island and Queens

#5 – Chef Wang in New Hyde Park

Chef-Wang-New-Hyde-ParkPromising Authentic Chinese cuisine, the Chef delivered on his promise.  Chef Wang has three extremely popular Chinese restaurants in Manhattan. This is his first venture to Long Island.  While Chef Wang wasn’t present this evening, clearly his staff has been well trained, and his Chef’s are upholding his “Legend”.  Chef Wang in New Hyde Park has now been open for a few years and is as popular as ever.  You can never go wrong dining here.

#4 – Joe’s Shanghai in Flushing

Joe's Shanghai in Manhattan New York CitySome people think of Joe’s as a Tourist trap, the place that one must go to, and they feel it’s overrated.  We disagree.  One of the first goldmines that we discovered on our Quest, this was a real authentic Chinese restaurant. The kind we’ve been looking for. No sugars and sweeteners to go with the tea. No fried noodles to munch on. No spare ribs on the menu. Joe’s Shanghai has a few different locations, including one in Chinatown, one in midtown, as well as in China and even Japan. But, it all started at this very location in Flushing, NY.  If you go, of course, you must order the Soup Dumplings, but in our humble opinion, no matter what you order after that will be fantastic too!

#3 – New Fu Run in Great Neck

New-Fu-Run-Great-Neck-OpenIt’s been a few years now since their Grand Opening and the restaurant has surely caught on as it attracts more and more diners who appreciate fine Chinese food to try their cuisine from the Dong Bei Province of China.  Different than their sister restaurant in Flushing, Fu Run Dong Bei, New Fu Run is tastefully decorated and fits right in on the upscale Gold Coast befitting the Gatsby’s and occasionally The Chinese Quest. 

We’ve been back to New Fu Run many many times, and it never disappoints.  Once a year, owner Tina Zhang travels to China and always comes back with some new and fresh recipes to add to their menu.  She recently returned, so it’s time to go back.  Christmas Day might be a good day to do just that.

#2 – Legend of Taste in Whitestone

Legend-of-Taste-Chinese-RestaurantDaring to go where no other authentic Chinese restaurant has gone before, “Legend of Taste” is located not in Flushing. Not in Little Neck. No. They ventured to be different and opened in the quiet Queens suburb of Whitestone. Why? Perhaps to separate themselves from the over-abundance of choices in those other towns. And also to differentiate themselves from all the other dining choices in Whitestone. After our visit, “Legend of Taste” will be a secret no more. Sorry, Whitestone!

And, our top recommendation (surprisingly?) is…

#1 – F-A-N Chinese Restaurant in Deer Park

F-A-N-Chinese-RestaurantThis Chinese restaurant has been confirmed to be open on Christmas Day.  Opened about a year ago, F-A-N Chinese Restaurant specializes in authentic Szechuan cuisine. The space is small, nicely decorated, and the English speaking waitstaff is friendly and helpful. The night we were there had a nice mix of Chinese and Caucasian customers.  And it smashed its way into the Top 5 of our Rankings of all Chinese restaurants on Long Island and New York City!

We have recommended F-A-N Chinese restaurant to many friends and every single one of them loves it! 

Chopsticks

Please note, we have not verified that all of these Chinese restaurants are in fact open on Christmas Day, so please call now to confirm, and to make a reservation!  If not, you can always try them another day.

Then please let us know in the comments below if you tried once of our recommendations, or went to a different Chinese restaurant.

Humbly submitted for your consumption,

Mee Magnum (“Chop!  Chop!”)

P.S.  If spice isn’t nice to your tummy, check out our Top 5 Cantonese Chinese restaurants.

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The post A Very Spicy (Jewish) Christmas appeared first on The Chinese Quest.


3 Most Expensive Chinese Dishes

What are the 3 most expensive Chinese dishes? What makes them so expensive? Why do people order them? Taste? Health Benefits? Status? Sexiness? Or Something else? The answer to these questions and more are found in this article! The post 3 Most Expensive Chinese Dishes appeared first on The Chinese...

Description: Chinese food comprises of at least two components: carbohydrates and accompanying dishes of meat, vegetables, and others. The features of most China food include; diverse colors, aromatic flavors and tastes good (hot, sweet, bitter, sour and salty). Why are some dishes so much more expensive than others?  And, why do people order them?

Introduction

People in Chinatown London and many other places in the world like extravagances. They can pay so much money for just a single chicken Chinese style meal, a meal that at times might not satisfy them. We also have foods that cost high because they are not easy to find, we all know that if the demand is high, the price will also become high. And most of the foods that cost high need more labor and resources to produce. In this article, we are going to talk about the most costly Chinese food.

3 Most Expensive Chinese Dishes

Bird’s Nest

Birds-Nest

On average, this dish is sold for 2,500 dollars per kilogram at Chinese restaurants. The nest gets collected a lot since people believe that it contains highly nutritive benefits which assist in:

  • Improving digestion process
  • Increasing libido
  • Improving awareness
  • General boosting of the immune system

We can’t tell if those claims are true but those nests have been eaten for a period of more than four hundred years now.

The enhancement came as a result of the stimulation of the activities of the body and hormones which require being strong for prime reproduction. Additional tests are needed to further prove the studies.

The major traditional advantage brought by this Chinese food is assisting reproductive wellness.

It is also alkaline in nature and has epidermal development factors. This assists in promoting the growth of cells. Also, studies to identify markers for anti-cancer units are ongoing. Up to date, people in China believe that nest soup aids in the treatment of TB, asthma, dry coughing and any weakness brought about by bronchial ailments.

And traditionally, the soup is used in nourishing important body organs such as the kidney, lungs, stomach, and heart. The soup is also believed to possess tone capabilities that improve the complexion of people’s skin and lowers the process of aging. The improvement is due to the stimulation of body activities and hormones which require being strong for perfect reproduction. Additional experiments are needed to prove those claims also.

Braised Whole Abalone

Braised-Whole-Abalone

This is the mollusk that hangs on rocks and eats seaweed. On a Chinese menu, it is put under the same group with Shark Fin Soup, Bird’s Nest, and Ginseng as the highly liked and most costly foods. The high cost of such Chinese dishes makes them status icons meant for festivals and parties like the opening of Willkommensbonus Ohne Einzahlung.

Abalone tastes the same as scallops which are tenderized before it is cooked.

How it this Chinese meal is prepared:

The classic way of preparing abalone Chinese food entails breading and frying. However, it tastes best when cooked as sushi or sashimi, stir-fried, grilled or when balanced in a soup.

People believe that this Chinese meal assists in preventing and treating illnesses such as arthritis. They also believe that the food makes eyes healthy, prevents colds, minimizes the retention of fluid and enhances the circulation of blood.

Shark Fin Soup

Shark-Fin-Soup

This is a common soup in every Chinese chef’s cooking style. Shark fins offer texture and the taste is gotten from the ingredients for making the soup.

Normally, it is served by the best Chinese restaurants during special events like weddings. It is also served as a luxurious food in Chinese culture.

Eating this Chinese food has become a way of celebrating special occasions in China. This Chinese food is also believed to help in improving health.

As per the Chinese health publication, the health benefits of Shark Fin Soup include:

  • Rejuvenating the skin
  • Increasing appetite
  • Improving body organs such as bones, lungs, and kidney
  • Good for energy

We assume that those health benefits are believed to be gotten from this Chinese food because sharks possess powerful resistance to infections and immunity against diseases like cancer.

Conclusion

Those are the most expensive foods you will find when you visit China. Have you tested any of them? Do you think they match their price tag? Post a Comment below. Write to us. Also, feel free to ask us any questions if you need more information about Chinese food recipes or any of the Chinese food we have talked about here.

Author bio

Thomas Glare is a Chinese resident who is also a chef in the Book of Ra Sushi restaurant. The foods talked about here are the most expensive ones in every Chinese restaurant. He also believes that they can benefit people’s health has claimed. Besides writing, he likes giving talks about living a healthy life.

The Chinese Quest welcomes original articles pertaining to the Chinese dining experience.  Your article should pertain to Chinese restaurants, Chinese food, recipes, etc.  For more information, please contact us.

Please share this article if you enjoyed it! click-to-share

The post 3 Most Expensive Chinese Dishes appeared first on The Chinese Quest.


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